HASLEMERE DECORATIVE AND FINE ARTS SOCIETY

A member society of NADFAS

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STUDY DAYS

These special interest days take place at the Haslemere Museum. There are either two lectures in the morning or two lectures in the morning and one in the afternoon with lunch in between. Morning coffee, wine and refreshments are included in the ticket price and on days with 3 lectures lunch is also included.


NOTE RE BOOKINGS

Bookings for Study Days usually take place two months in advance at the monthly lectures on the third Tuesday of the month.
Members are asked to turn up to reserve their place and may book and pay for themselves and up to one other member.

PAST STUDY DAYS in 2017

THURSDAY 9th FEBRUARY

NICOLE MEZEY
SMOKE, MIRRORS AND SANCTITY: The Tudors and the Arts of Propaganda
The art and artefacts of an extraordinary century and the context which they illuminate.

Detail of King Edward VI and the Pope by Unknown artist, oil on panel, circa 1575
Detail of King Edward VI and the Pope by Unknown artist, oil on panel, circa 1575, National Portrait Gallery.


Six wives, phantom pregnancies and a Virgin Queen – in barely 100 years the upstart Tudor dynasty produced some of the great dramatic characters of British history. It also steered the realm into the modern age and virtually invented the art of propaganda through portraits by such artists as Holbein and palaces which outshone the finest of its European rivals. In an age of intense religious conflict, church commissions were followed by the destruction of monasteries and their heritage and, throughout, as monarchs impose their changing allegiances on the people, the arts herald the virtues of their chosen Faiths.

 

Nicole Mezey studied at the Universities of Sussex, York and Paris before becoming Senior Lecturer at Queen’s University, Belfast. There she established the Department of Art History. She is currently a freelance lecturer for NADFAS, the National Museum of Northern Ireland, Queen’s University and the National Trust. Her publications focus on adult education and the arts. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.


Booking opens at December 2016 lecture.
Ticket price: £30
Price includes morning coffee and lunch with wine
(Tickets are non refundable)

PROGRAMME
10.00 hrs: coffee and biscuits
10.30–11.30 hrs: first lecture
11.40–12.40 hrs: second lecture
12.45 hrs: lunch
14.00–15.00 hrs: third lecture


WEDNESDAY 3rd MAY  Morning only – 2 lectures

DENISE HAYWOOD
LEGEND AND LUSTRE: Jim Thompson and Thai Silk
The story of his achievements, the production of Thai silk and its artistic heritage
.
Loom with inset of Jim Thopmson
Loom on display in Jim Thompson’s House in Bangkok with inset of Jim Thompson.

Jim Thompson arrived in Bangkok as a US army officer in 1945, fell in love with it and stayed. Captivated by the lustrous beauty of Thai silk, he resuscitated an ancient craft in decline and made it famous, creating costumes for films and embellishing his historic house, which today is a museum. An aesthete and art collector, he created an exquisite home from six hand–carved teakwood houses brought from the countryside and filled it with Asian art. Here he became a celebrated society host. Thess lectures describe his achievements, showing the intricacy of silk production and its artistic heritage, including royal robes and dance costumes. It touches on films with his silks such as The King and I, reveals his house and its art, and reflects on a life that ended abruptly with his mysterious disappearance.

 

Denise Heywood is an author, lecturer, photographer and journalist. She worked in Cambodia as a journalist for three years. Now based in London, she is a lecturer for the National Association of Decorative and Fine Art Societies (NADFAS), The Art Fund, The School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London) on their post–graduate Asian Art Course and Madingley Hall (University of Cambridge). She writes for many art, literary and travel publications, has appeared on television and radio, leads art tours to Southeast Asia and France and lectures on cruise ships sailing throughout Asia.


Booking opens at March lecture.
Ticket price: £18.
Price includes morning coffee, wine and refreshments after the lecture
(Tickets are non refundable)

PROGRAMME
10.00 hrs: coffee and biscuits
10.30–11.30 hrs: first lecture
11.40–12.40 hrs: second lecture
12.40 hrs: wine and refreshments


WEDNESDAY 4th OCTOBER  Morning only – 2 lectures

SARAH SEARIGHT
1. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM and Early Islamic Art
2. THE ISLAMIC GARDEN and Later Islamic Art

Reciting poetry in a garden, tile panel, early 17th centry, Iran (probably Isfahan)

Reciting poetry in a garden, tile panel, early 17th centry, Iran (probably Isfahan) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Islamic art encompasses the visual arts produced from the 7th century onwards by culturally Islamic populations. It is thus a very difficult art to define because it covers many lands and various peoples over some 1400 years; it is not art specifically of a religion, or of a time, or of a place, or of a single medium like painting. It covers fields as varied as calligraphy, painting, glass, ceramics, and textiles, among others. Islamic art is not at all restricted to religious art, but includes all the art of the rich and varied cultures of Islamic societies as well. It frequently includes secular elements and elements that are frowned upon, if not forbidden, by some Islamic theologians. Apart from the ever–present calligraphic inscriptions, specifically religious art is actually less prominent in Islamic art than in Western medieval art, with the exception of Islamic architecture where mosques and their complexes of surrounding buildings are the most common remains. Figurative painting may cover religious scenes, but normally in essentially secular contexts such as the walls of palaces or illuminated books of poetry.

 

Sarah Searight is a graduate of Oxford University and the School of Oriental and African Studies at London. She now lectures on the modern history, art and architecture of the Islamic world. She is the author of the acclaimed books, ‘The British in the Middle East’ and ‘Yemen: Land and People’, as well as many other books and articles about the region. Her most recent book, published in 2010, is ‘Lapis Lazuli: in Pursuit of a Celestial Stone’ which examines how people have used this most significant of semi–precious stones through the ages.


Booking opens at June lecture.
Ticket price: £18.
Price includes morning coffee, wine and refreshments after the lecture.
(Tickets are non refundable)

PROGRAMME
10.00 hrs: coffee and biscuits
10.30–11.30 hrs: first lecture
11.40–12.40 hrs: second lecture
12.40 hrs: wine and refreshments

Telephone contact no.: 01483 861439